Sitting continuously for long hours can increase the risk of cancer

Lifestyle

Sitting continuously for long hours can increase the risk of cancer

Work from home has become the new normal. This new normal can definitely help reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus but has led to other problems.

One of the biggest problems it has led to is the increase in the inactivity level.

We are sitting for much longer hours than we used to when we were working from office. Increased work pressure and the comfort of our homes has made us super inactive.

Sample this. How many times do you get up from your chair while working from home? Probably only to have lunch or to use the bathroom. If this sounds relatable, this article is a must-read for you.

The study

A study published in the monthly medical journal Jama Oncology found that there is a strong link between sitting for long hours, leading a sedentary lifestyle and death due to cancer.

Are you scared? Don’t be. Because the same study also suggests that simple lifestyle changes can save a person. These simple changes include some form of physical activity everyday.

Just by moving for 30 minutes extra every day, the risk of cancer can be reduced by 31 per cent. The lead researchers of the study, Dr Susan Gilchrist, who is also an associate professor of clinical cancer prevention at the University of Texas, said that the study’s finding reinforced that it’s absolutely important to sit less and move more.

We all have more work than ever. Tight schedules and shorter deadlines have occupied us all too much. Thus, if you cannot involve yourself in an intense workout, you can just take half an hour stroll after you finish your work. If you cannot go out later in the day after work, try and get up in between and walk around the house a bit.

Two easy ways to walk more

  1. When you get work calls, do not sit at one place, instead of walk around.
  2. You can also go up and down the stairs while you talk on the phone or when you get up to drink water or use the loo.

Researched recorded the movement of 8,000 people for over one week for the study. Most inactive people were 82 per cent more likely to have died from cancer as compared to those who were leading the least sedentary life. It was noticed that people who instead of sitting and working for longer hours, did some light physical activity like walking, were 8 per cent less likely to get cancer.